Turkey Day Tidings

Have you emerged from this weekend feeling like you’re the butterball? Canadian Thanksgiving will do that to you. But if you spent time sharing a festive meal with loved ones, wasn’t it worth sacrificing a belt hole or two? To mark the holiday, we at 50 Good Deeds present you with six fun facts about Thanksgiving and giving thanks.

1. Experts say Thanksgiving is one of our most chill national holidays. Compared to other holidays that involve a string of social obligations, a vulgar amount of gift-shopping, or potential long drives through blizzards, there’s not much to stress us out at Thanksgiving. Really, you might spend a few minutes fretting over whether the brined method truly is best, but that’s about it. Hey, we even get a long weekend.

2. There are 531 turkey farmers in Canada. They supply Canadians with over three million whole turkeys at Thanksgiving time. The scope of the tofurkey industry is a little less clear.

3. Cranberries were used as a symbol of peace by certain Aboriginal groups in North America. In our family, it still works: Pass the cranberry sauce and pipe down.

3. If you’ve ever experienced a post-Thanksgiving-dinner food coma, don’t blame the tryptophan in turkeys. Scientists say it’s more likely a result of the obscene amount of calories you’ve just taken in, or the alcohol (or both, we’re all saying to ourselves right now).

4. “Thank you” comes from the same root word as “think,” and implies that you’ll remember fondly this kindness that’s been done to you. In Portuguese, obligato roughly means, “I owe you one.” In Finnish, kiitos is from the same word for praise. When you thank someone in Finland, you’re actually saying, “Praise be to you!”

5. When you express thanks to someone who’s done you a favour, you increase the likelihood that they’ll help another person. When you bring someone a thank-you note, your own happiness level rises. When you send a thank-you note to a hiring manager after an interview, you’re more likely to land the job. Thanking people pays off.

6. In the Middle Ages, turkeys were commonly referred to as turkey coqs. That is all.

I’ll leave you with this quote, sourced out by an 11-year-old at our Thanksgiving dinner party, and read aloud to guests: “Be thankful for what you have. Your life, no matter how bad you think it is, is someone else’s fairy tale.” It’s food for thought. And it might make a more lasting impression than the turkey leftovers.

Something’s missing. Oh, yes, it’s milk, eggs, spices and 45 minutes in the oven.

Something’s missing. Oh, yes, it’s milk, eggs, spices and 45 minutes in the oven.

6 responses to “Turkey Day Tidings

  1. Your 11-year-old guest is very wise – I used this same message on FB as my Thanksgiving greeting. 🙂

  2. Clearly, great minds think alike…

  3. That’s definitely a wise saying. Never heard it before but it will stick with me forever. 🙂

  4. I like it too. Somehow it reminds me of this one, which is one of my favourites and which I quote often: “If we all threw our problems into a pile and saw everyone else’s, we’d grab ours back.”

  5. Katherine Harman

    Thanks Lisa — I guess Thanksgiving must be one of the centre-pieces for 50 Good Deeds…. let’s everyone keep remembering what makes our lives so blessed. Mine was quiet, just family, as you said; “chill”.

  6. Wonderful words, Katherine! Thank you!

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